(via distraughtteen)

owsposters:

"Military Opportunities"

owsposters:

"Military Opportunities"

(via loveofjustice)

woodstock-weddings:

Oh how i dream of having a camper like this & wandering off on our travels for our honeymoon……mmmmmmm bliss!

woodstock-weddings:

Oh how i dream of having a camper like this & wandering off on our travels for our honeymoon……mmmmmmm bliss!

Do you realize that all great literature is all about what a bummer it is to be a human being? Isn’t it such a relief to have somebody say that?

– Kurt Vonnegut (via wordswithinyou)

And I asked myself about the present: how wide it was, how deep it was, how much was mine to keep.

– Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (via observando)

(via wereallllmadhere)

andythanfiction:

specialkthegreat:

cardsofwind:

THIS. MOTHERFREAKING THIS.

Excuse me as I causally anonymously mail this to all my relatives’ homes

I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again: Equating all Muslims with the Taliban or Al-Quaeda is like equating all Christians with the Westboro Baptist Church or those who bomb abortion clinics.

andythanfiction:

specialkthegreat:

cardsofwind:

THIS. MOTHERFREAKING THIS.

Excuse me as I causally anonymously mail this to all my relatives’ homes

I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again: Equating all Muslims with the Taliban or Al-Quaeda is like equating all Christians with the Westboro Baptist Church or those who bomb abortion clinics.

(via vinylsticker)

mythicalogical:

thesexypenguin:


The educational system in one image.

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will spend the rest of its life thinking it’s an idiot.” -Albert Einstein

Reblogging. always. always. always.

mythicalogical:

thesexypenguin:

The educational system in one image.

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will spend the rest of its life thinking it’s an idiot.” -Albert Einstein

Reblogging. always. always. always.

(via audreyprince)

staff:

Bad news. A major vulnerability, known as “Heartbleed,” has been disclosed for the technology that powers encryption across the majority of the internet. That includes Tumblr.

We have no evidence of any breach and, like most networks, our team took immediate action to fix the issue.

But this…

staceythinx:

Jello Presidents was a project by photographer Henry Hargreaves that he worked on during the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.
staceythinx:

Jello Presidents was a project by photographer Henry Hargreaves that he worked on during the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.
staceythinx:

Jello Presidents was a project by photographer Henry Hargreaves that he worked on during the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.
staceythinx:

Jello Presidents was a project by photographer Henry Hargreaves that he worked on during the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.
staceythinx:

Jello Presidents was a project by photographer Henry Hargreaves that he worked on during the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.

staceythinx:

Jello Presidents was a project by photographer Henry Hargreaves that he worked on during the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.

irrationalliberal:

Source

irrationalliberal:

Source

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.
our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. 
light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.
the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way. 
photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.
awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.
our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. 
light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.
the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way. 
photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.
awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.
our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. 
light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.
the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way. 
photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.
awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.
our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. 
light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.
the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way. 
photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.
awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.
our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. 
light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.
the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way. 
photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.
awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.
our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways. 
light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.
the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way. 
photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.

awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.

our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways.

light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.

the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way.

photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.

(via gaksdesigns)

astronomicalwonders:

The Great Andromeda Galaxy, M31
The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy and it the closest large galaxy to the milky way (this is not including dwarf galaxies). It is approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda and is listed as the 31st object in Messier’s catalog of large night-sky objects. 
Andromeda is one of the easiest objects to spot in the night sky. It can be seen on a clear night with the unaided eye as a faint smudge of light about 3 times the apparent length of the moon. This makes the Galaxy a great viewing/imaging target if you have a pair of binoculars or a telescope. 
Like our milky way galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy has smaller satellite galaxy, known as dwarf galaxies, that orbit it. One of these dwarf galaxies can be seen in the above images as a small smudge below Andromeda’s galactic disk.
The top image shows a wide field view of the Andromeda Galaxy. The next two images show wide field views of the galaxy in infrared and ultraviolet light and the last two are infrared and ultraviolet images taken recently by the Spitzer space telescope.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/Wikipedia
astronomicalwonders:

The Great Andromeda Galaxy, M31
The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy and it the closest large galaxy to the milky way (this is not including dwarf galaxies). It is approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda and is listed as the 31st object in Messier’s catalog of large night-sky objects. 
Andromeda is one of the easiest objects to spot in the night sky. It can be seen on a clear night with the unaided eye as a faint smudge of light about 3 times the apparent length of the moon. This makes the Galaxy a great viewing/imaging target if you have a pair of binoculars or a telescope. 
Like our milky way galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy has smaller satellite galaxy, known as dwarf galaxies, that orbit it. One of these dwarf galaxies can be seen in the above images as a small smudge below Andromeda’s galactic disk.
The top image shows a wide field view of the Andromeda Galaxy. The next two images show wide field views of the galaxy in infrared and ultraviolet light and the last two are infrared and ultraviolet images taken recently by the Spitzer space telescope.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/Wikipedia
astronomicalwonders:

The Great Andromeda Galaxy, M31
The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy and it the closest large galaxy to the milky way (this is not including dwarf galaxies). It is approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda and is listed as the 31st object in Messier’s catalog of large night-sky objects. 
Andromeda is one of the easiest objects to spot in the night sky. It can be seen on a clear night with the unaided eye as a faint smudge of light about 3 times the apparent length of the moon. This makes the Galaxy a great viewing/imaging target if you have a pair of binoculars or a telescope. 
Like our milky way galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy has smaller satellite galaxy, known as dwarf galaxies, that orbit it. One of these dwarf galaxies can be seen in the above images as a small smudge below Andromeda’s galactic disk.
The top image shows a wide field view of the Andromeda Galaxy. The next two images show wide field views of the galaxy in infrared and ultraviolet light and the last two are infrared and ultraviolet images taken recently by the Spitzer space telescope.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/Wikipedia
astronomicalwonders:

The Great Andromeda Galaxy, M31
The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy and it the closest large galaxy to the milky way (this is not including dwarf galaxies). It is approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda and is listed as the 31st object in Messier’s catalog of large night-sky objects. 
Andromeda is one of the easiest objects to spot in the night sky. It can be seen on a clear night with the unaided eye as a faint smudge of light about 3 times the apparent length of the moon. This makes the Galaxy a great viewing/imaging target if you have a pair of binoculars or a telescope. 
Like our milky way galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy has smaller satellite galaxy, known as dwarf galaxies, that orbit it. One of these dwarf galaxies can be seen in the above images as a small smudge below Andromeda’s galactic disk.
The top image shows a wide field view of the Andromeda Galaxy. The next two images show wide field views of the galaxy in infrared and ultraviolet light and the last two are infrared and ultraviolet images taken recently by the Spitzer space telescope.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/Wikipedia
astronomicalwonders:

The Great Andromeda Galaxy, M31
The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy and it the closest large galaxy to the milky way (this is not including dwarf galaxies). It is approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda and is listed as the 31st object in Messier’s catalog of large night-sky objects. 
Andromeda is one of the easiest objects to spot in the night sky. It can be seen on a clear night with the unaided eye as a faint smudge of light about 3 times the apparent length of the moon. This makes the Galaxy a great viewing/imaging target if you have a pair of binoculars or a telescope. 
Like our milky way galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy has smaller satellite galaxy, known as dwarf galaxies, that orbit it. One of these dwarf galaxies can be seen in the above images as a small smudge below Andromeda’s galactic disk.
The top image shows a wide field view of the Andromeda Galaxy. The next two images show wide field views of the galaxy in infrared and ultraviolet light and the last two are infrared and ultraviolet images taken recently by the Spitzer space telescope.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/Wikipedia

astronomicalwonders:

The Great Andromeda Galaxy, M31

The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy and it the closest large galaxy to the milky way (this is not including dwarf galaxies). It is approximately 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda and is listed as the 31st object in Messier’s catalog of large night-sky objects.

Andromeda is one of the easiest objects to spot in the night sky. It can be seen on a clear night with the unaided eye as a faint smudge of light about 3 times the apparent length of the moon. This makes the Galaxy a great viewing/imaging target if you have a pair of binoculars or a telescope.

Like our milky way galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy has smaller satellite galaxy, known as dwarf galaxies, that orbit it. One of these dwarf galaxies can be seen in the above images as a small smudge below Andromeda’s galactic disk.

The top image shows a wide field view of the Andromeda Galaxy. The next two images show wide field views of the galaxy in infrared and ultraviolet light and the last two are infrared and ultraviolet images taken recently by the Spitzer space telescope.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble/Wikipedia

(via n8-ascents)